The Library Book

The Library Book

Book - 2018 | First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
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The author reopens the unsolved mystery of the most catastrophic library fire in American history. This book chronicles the Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) fire, and its aftermath, to showcase the crucial role that libraries play in our lives. The author delves into the evolution of libraries around the world, from their humble beginnings to their status as a cornerstone of the community; brings the departments of the library to life through on-the-ground reporting; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL. The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library? In addition to examining the circumstances of the fire, the author delves into the history of the LAPL. The book introduces us to a cast of characters from libraries past and present - from Mary Foy; who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the LAPL at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, "The Human Encyclopedia," who roamed the library dispensing information. The book introduces readers to Charles Lummis, an eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, and to the staff in the twenty-first century, who work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.--adapted from publisher's description and end-papers.
Publisher: New York : Simon and Schuster, 2018
Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
ISBN: 9781476740188
1476740186
9781476740195
1476740194
9781476740201
1476740208
9781782392262
1782392262
Characteristics: 319 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

In 1986, the Los Angeles Public Library lost almost half a million books to a raging fire. Who started the fire, and why?


From the critics


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m
Monkeybuns
Mar 14, 2021

Engaging read for anyone who loves books and enjoys libraries. Built around the story of the devastating fire at the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986, Orlean covers the colorful history of the library and everything that goes on there, licit or not.

7
728_emily
Dec 28, 2020

This book was an absolute delight! I love libraries, and I learned so much from this engaging book about libraries past and present. Now I feel even more excited for the day when I can sit and read in the library again like normal.

k
Kit_k
Dec 15, 2020

Thoroughly enjoyed this one. Part true-crime, part colourful history of the LA Central Library and all love story for libraries and the unique people who visit and work in them. Recommend!

d
DBooks_0
Dec 06, 2020

Absolutely loved this book. Loved the various stories that were told.

u
uncommonreader
Aug 15, 2020

A love letter to all libraries and the wonderful people who work in them.
One cannot overestimate their value to the community.

s
supernova_reader
Aug 13, 2020

Very enjoyable read. Orlean is a great storyteller, and I liked how the story expanded to explore interesting asides about the history of libraries and the people who appreciate them. I couldn't stop telling people around me cool tidbits I learned from this book!

IndyPL_ShainaS Jun 19, 2020

I love how Orlean's conversational voice draws the reader in. Her love for libraries and stories and history is compelling, and a reflection of my own love. It's a strange main tale to be sure, of a devastating library fire and the enigmatic compulsive liar who possibly set it, woven around a series of vignettes about the many aspects of library service. Some of Orlean's musings felt like a strike to my heart; others felt a little flat or unfinished. Overall, I think Orlean did a lovely job of conveying the power of libraries and how they'll be around for as long as people wish to hold onto stories.

c
cdarin11
Jun 15, 2020

What a treat! Have been able to spend the time at home with "The Library Book". Have been following up on Charles F. Lummis one of the more colorful librarians. Reading his "A Tramp across the Continent" . He walked for 143 days from Cincinnati to Los Angeles starting in sept 11, 1884. Hope the book and I survive the corona virus.

h
Herbivore_Reader
Jun 10, 2020

A book to read while I was missing the library during the shutdown. Lots of different threads here and they didn't all tie up at the end and, while I don't care as much about the LA library as someone living there, I appreciated the general reflection on the history and value of libraries in society.

c
Cooper8888
Jun 06, 2020

For December 17, Tri Delta

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IndyPL_ShainaS Jun 19, 2020

You don't need to take a book off a shelf to know there is a voice inside that is waiting to speak to you, and behind that was someone who truly believed that if he or she spoke, someone would listen. It was that affirmation that always amazed me. Even the oddest, most particular book was written with that kind of crazy courage--the writer's belief that someone would find his or her book important to read. I was struck by how precious and foolish and brave that belief is, and how necessary, and how full of hope it is to collect these books and manuscripts and preserve them. It declares that all these stories matter, and so does every effort to create something that connects us to one another, and to our past and to what is still to come.

IndyPL_ShainaS Jun 19, 2020

The idea of being forgotten is terrifying... Writing a book, just like building a library, is an act of sheer defiance. It is a declaration that you believe in the persistence of memory.

IndyPL_ShainaS Jun 19, 2020

Any book accidentally shelved in the sections that burned; we will never know what they were, so we cannot know what we are missing.

IndyPL_ShainaS Jun 19, 2020

It wasn't that time stopped in the library. It was as if it were captured here, collected here, and in all libraries--and not only my time, my life, but all human time as well. In the library, time is dammed up--not just stopped but saved. The library is a gathering pool of narratives and of the people who come to find them. It is where we can glimpse immortality; in the library, we can live forever.

t
thebritlass
Aug 01, 2019

"In Senegal, the polite expression for saying someone died is to say his or her library has burned....our minds and souls contain volumes inscribed by our experiences and emotions; each individual's consciousness is a collection of memories we've cataloged and stored inside us, a private library of a life lived. It is something that no one else can entirely share; one that burns down and disappears when we die. But if you can take something from that internal collection and share it--with one person or with the larger world, on the page or in a story recited - it takes on a life of its own."

p
Panchesco
Jul 08, 2019

“Sometimes it's harder to notice a place you think you know well; your eyes glide over it, seeing it but not seeing it at all. It's almost as if familiarity gives you a kind of temporary blindness. I had to force myself to look harder and try to see beyond the concept of library that was so latent in my brain.”

l
Liber_vermis
Mar 19, 2019

"When I first learned that the library had a shipping department ... I couldn't think of anything a library needed to ship. I came to learn that what gets shipped ... [are] books traveling from one branch to another. The shipping department at Central moves thirty-two thousand books - the equivalent of an entire branch library - around the city of Los Angeles five days a week. It is as if the city has a bloodstream flowing through it, oxygenated by books." (p. 61)

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mrlacroix
Sep 05, 2019

mrlacroix thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

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MelissaBee
Jan 30, 2019

MelissaBee thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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