When to Rob A Bank

When to Rob A Bank

And 131 More Warped Suggestions and Well-intended Rants From the Freakonomics Guys

Large Print - 2015 | Large print edition
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In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the landmark book Freakonomics comes this curated collection from the most readable economics blog in the universe. It's the perfect solution for the millions of readers who love all things Freakonomics. Surprising and erudite, eloquent and witty, When to Rob a Bank demonstrates the brilliance that has made the Freakonomics guys an international sensation, with more than 7 million books sold in 40 languages, and 150 million downloads of their Freakonomics Radio podcast.

When Freakonomics was first published, the authors started a blog--and they've kept it up. The writing is more casual, more personal, even more outlandish than in their books. In When to Rob a Bank, they ask a host of typically off-center questions: Why don't flight attendants get tipped? If you were a terrorist, how would you attack? And why does KFC always run out of fried chicken?

Over the past decade, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner have published more than 8,000 blog posts on Freakonomics.com. Many of them, they freely admit, were rubbish. But now they've gone through and picked the best of the best. You'll discover what people lie about, and why; the best way to cut gun deaths; why it might be time for a sex tax; and, yes, when to rob a bank. (Short answer: never; the ROI is terrible.) You'll also learn a great deal about Levitt and Dubner's own quirks and passions, from gambling and golf to backgammon and the abolition of the penny.

Publisher: New York, NY : HarperLuxe, [2015]
Edition: Large print edition
ISBN: 9780062392725
0062392727
Characteristics: large print
x, 418 pages ; 23 cm
Additional Contributors: Dubner, Stephen J.

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r
ryner
Oct 11, 2017

Following the success of Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner started an online blog where they began to post short essays, news and musings in a similar vein, exploring the odd and compelling world of economics. These brief, bite-sized articles were an enjoyable recreational read, though I'm finding that I'm not a huge fan of the blog-to-book format. Current readers of the blog may not find anything new here, but if you're new to the world of Freakonomics this could be both entertaining and educational.

m
MaxCW26
Sep 18, 2017

Easy read of the top blog posts of the Freakonomics blog. A ton of interesting ideas are presented, some comedic and others touching on issues like gun control and health care. Would have liked to have seen some, if not most, of the ideas explored more in detail but hopefully they're saving that for a future book.

m
MplsTA
Jun 05, 2017

An interesting collection of blogs. I skipped many of them but there were a few that were interesting and useful such as how the internet changed car buying and the new car mating dance. Worth reading if you are shopping around for a car.

j
JLMason
Sep 10, 2015

They're really cashing in with this book, a reprint of their best blog posts. That said, it was a light and entertaining read, and provided a good overview of the range of topics they have examined through the lens of an economist.

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